Day 2 / Session 3: Re-imagining the Archive

The emergence of cloud computing, on-line access to virtually the entire cultural and historical memory of the world, and the proliferation of on-demand print and media-distribution. The function of collections and archives is changed so dramatically by these new conditions, that it’s being questioned altogether. At the same time, the new digital media context offers an enormous opportunity for a deeply transformed and much richer relationship of heritage institutions and archives with their audiences. These audiences can now be actively involved in the maintenance, curation, circulation and contextualisation of archived resources. With increasingly unfeathered access via internet the wider public can now actively engage with these archived materials and put them to their own uses – in education, at home, but also professionally.

How can heritage institutions and archives best respond to these new opportunities and challenges? What is the new role of archive professionals as ‘holders and curators of culture’, and simultaneously as the facilitators for their radically enlarged (and demanding) audiences?

Kate Theimer: keynote ‘Archives as Platform: Reimagining Our Mission’

Mirko Tobias Schaefer: ‘A Critical Perspective on User Participation’

The opening statements & the panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’ offer a variety of perspectives on the implications of cloud computing, on-line access to virtually the entire cultural and historical memory of the world and the proliferation of on-demand print and media-distribution, on archives as ‘memory institutions. Because the re-use and collaborative on-line production of digital media productions has become so much easier, the ‘archived’ works are no longer simply a memory of the past, but increasingly become part of an active production ‘life cycle’.

Dan Streible: opening statement panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’

Alan Hanjalic: opening statement for panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’

Panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’: Dan Streible & Alan Hanjalic

The next panelists deal with the the changing conditions mentioned earlier, and the potential these have for creating a deeply transformed and much richer relationship of heritage institutions and archives with their audiences. These audiences can now be actively involved in the maintenance, curation, circulation and contextualisation of archived resources. With increasingly unfeathered access via internet the wider public can now actively engage with these archived materials and put them to their own uses – in education, at home, but also professionally.

John Ellis: opening statement panel ‘Active Audiences’

BTW here’s the film clip John Ellis showed in his presentation: http://www.britishpathe.com/video/animal-museum

Trivia 1: Walter Potter’s collection of taxidermy was sold off piece by piece by Bonham in 2003: http://www.bonhams.com/auctions/10593/.
Trivia 2: Damien Hirst once claimed in this Guardian article that he made a £1M offer on the full collection.

Julia Noordegraaf: opening statement panel ‘Active Audiences’

Panel ‘Active Audiences’: John Ellis & Julia Noordegraaf

Day 1 / Parallel track: Metadata

Day 1 / Parallel track: Metadata

The section Metadata, Roeland Ordelman (Sound and Vision) was the first presenter. In his talk about audio metadata extraction he explained some principles of voice and image recognition. Soeluh van den Berg (EYE) who started his presentation from preparation to conservation and metadata creation of photographic material follows him up. In the presentation about the metadata of film, Maaike de Bie (Sound and Vision) talks about the development of a workflow for metadata, the pros and cons of the current workflow and lessons learned.

Parallel track 13: Soeluh van den Berg – Metadata: Photography

Parallel track 12: Roeland Ordelman – Metadata: Audio Metadata extraction

Parallel track 19: Maaike de Bie – Metadata: Film

Day 1 / Parallel track: Storage and retrieval of digital assets

Day 1 / Parallel track: Storage and retrieval of digital assets

The section Storage and retrieval of digital assets includes three presentations. Phillip Maher (Sound and Vision) gives the first presentation. He explains current storage configurations and shares the expected challenges in the near future. Jata Haan (EYE) focuses on digital access for archival material and uses an EYE case study in her explanation. In the third presentation, Anne Gant (EYE) talks about digital-born film workflows for accession and preservation and how to bring digital films into the archive.

Parallel track 9: Philip Maher – Storage and retrieval of digital assets

Parallel track 10: Jata Haan – Storage and retrieval of digital assets

Parallel track 11: Anne Gant – Storage and retrieval of digital assets

Day 1 / Parallel track: Digitization

Day 1 / Parallel track: Digitization

In the section Digitization Erwin Verbruggen (Sound and Vision) is first to talk about the digitization of Film. He focuses on choosing equipment and standards for in-house digitization, the pros and cons of the choices made and some lessons learned. Valentine Kuypers and Leony Kleine (Sound and Vision) give a duo presentation about the digitizing of unusual formats. How can you set up an in-house digitization workflow for 78rpm records and VHS tapes? The next duo presentation of Joop Korswagen and Martina Hoffman (Dutch National Archives) deals with guidelines for digitizing photographic collections and using monitoring tools. Last Stefan Lalleman (Sound and Vision) speaks about adapting requirements to new digitizing techniques in the digitization of photographic material.

Parallel track 5: Erwin Verbruggen – Digitization: Film

Parallel track 6: Valentine Kuypers & Leony Kleine – Digitization: Equipment

Parallel track 7: Joop Korswagen & Martina Hoffmann – Digitization: Photography

Parallel track 8: Stefan Lalleman – Digitization: Photography