Tuesday 28 Mar 2017

Day 2 / Session 3: Re-imagining the Archive

The emergence of cloud computing, on-line access to virtually the entire cultural and historical memory of the world, and the proliferation of on-demand print and media-distribution. The function of collections and archives is changed so dramatically by these new conditions, that it’s being questioned altogether. At the same time, the new digital media context offers an enormous opportunity for a deeply transformed and much richer relationship of heritage institutions and archives with their audiences. These audiences can now be actively involved in the maintenance, curation, circulation and contextualisation of archived resources. With increasingly unfeathered access via internet the wider public can now actively engage with these archived materials and put them to their own uses – in education, at home, but also professionally.

How can heritage institutions and archives best respond to these new opportunities and challenges? What is the new role of archive professionals as ‘holders and curators of culture’, and simultaneously as the facilitators for their radically enlarged (and demanding) audiences?

Kate Theimer: keynote ‘Archives as Platform: Reimagining Our Mission’

Mirko Tobias Schaefer: ‘A Critical Perspective on User Participation’

The opening statements & the panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’ offer a variety of perspectives on the implications of cloud computing, on-line access to virtually the entire cultural and historical memory of the world and the proliferation of on-demand print and media-distribution, on archives as ‘memory institutions. Because the re-use and collaborative on-line production of digital media productions has become so much easier, the ‘archived’ works are no longer simply a memory of the past, but increasingly become part of an active production ‘life cycle’.

Dan Streible: opening statement panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’

Alan Hanjalic: opening statement for panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities’

Panel ‘Memory Institutions and Digital Humanities': Dan Streible & Alan Hanjalic

The next panelists deal with the the changing conditions mentioned earlier, and the potential these have for creating a deeply transformed and much richer relationship of heritage institutions and archives with their audiences. These audiences can now be actively involved in the maintenance, curation, circulation and contextualisation of archived resources. With increasingly unfeathered access via internet the wider public can now actively engage with these archived materials and put them to their own uses – in education, at home, but also professionally.

John Ellis: opening statement panel ‘Active Audiences’

BTW here’s the film clip John Ellis showed in his presentation: http://www.britishpathe.com/video/animal-museum

Trivia 1: Walter Potter’s collection of taxidermy was sold off piece by piece by Bonham in 2003: http://www.bonhams.com/auctions/10593/.
Trivia 2: Damien Hirst once claimed in this Guardian article that he made a £1M offer on the full collection.

Julia Noordegraaf: opening statement panel ‘Active Audiences’

Panel ‘Active Audiences': John Ellis & Julia Noordegraaf

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